China

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China (People's Republic of China) is an official distribution region for the Yu-Gi-Oh! Official Card Game, with sets printed in Simplified Chinese. In April 2020, it was announced that select OCG sets printed in Simplified Chinese would be distributed in mainland China,[1] and the first two sets were officially announced in August of that year: Starter Deck 2020 and Structure Deck: The Blue-Eyed Dragon's Thundering Descent.[2][3][4]

Censorship[edit]

"Tour Guide From the Underworld" (from left to right): original incarnation in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links; censored incarnation in the Chinese edition of Duel Links; Official Proxy in the Simplified Chinese print of Rarity Collection Premium Gold Edition.

Due to China's censorship policies, any images or symbolism involving death or excessive violence, notably skulls and skeletons, have been removed from the country's media.[5] This is especially evident in the Chinese edition of Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links.[6]

Despite this, images such as skeletons and skulls are not censored in printed Simplified Chinese sets. This is because the sets are originally created in South Korea, and imported to Mainland China. They do not fall under the administration of authoritative departments that deal with domestic publishing, and are thus not censored as long as they do not involve explicit content or directly attack the Chinese government.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. K (April 16, 2020). "The Organization | Mainland China to get the OCG". YGOrganization. Retrieved January 19, 2021. 
  2. "简体中文版「游戏王OCG」商品!来临预告_哔哩哔哩 (゜-゜)つロ 干杯~-bilibili" (in Chinese). August 8, 2020. Retrieved January 19, 2021. 
  3. DSummon (August 3, 2020). "Yu-Gi-Oh! Simplified Chinese version announced - Beyond the Duel". Beyond the Duel. Retrieved January 19, 2021. 
  4. NeoArkadia (August 4, 2020). "The Organization | [OCG] Simplified Chinese Version of Yu-Gi-Oh! Announced". YGOrganization. Retrieved January 19, 2021. 
  5. Zheping Huang (April 23, 2019). "China’s new rules on video games: no blood, dead bodies, or mahjong - Inkstone". Inkstone. Retrieved January 19, 2021.